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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 201 (some duplicates have been removed)
in today. these are officer cadets at britain's most exclusive private school drilling in 1915. now, one of the things about the wars that we have gotten accustomed to in this country in recent years, vietnam, iraq, and the stand is that they are fox mostly by the poor. they are are very very few among the dead and wounded in those three wars who have been sons or daughters off ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite and the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the aristocracy, to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries. they are there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland, and so therefore officer in the army
, news international closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitabl
closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and
television in britain. the business consequences of this scandal are still unfolding, but the legal consequences started unfolding years ago. in 2007, a "news of the world" editor and private investigator hired by the paper were jailed for the phone hacking. the editor, andy coulson denied knowing about the hacking but resigned anyway. david cameron then hired that editor, andy coulson, to be a communications director for them. last week he and another editor were arrested for hacking and bribery charges. told about the involvement in the scandal at the time cameron was hiring him. cameron announced an official inquiry. >> after listening carefully, we've decided the best way to proceed is with one inquiry, but in two parts. i can tell the house this inquiry will be led by one of the most senior judges in this country and under the 2005 inquiries act. newspaper reporters, management, pro -- barbara boxer, jay rockefeller and bob menendez have all called for investigations by the justice department and securities and exchange commission. the senators say they want to know if american
. the fall of scotland yard? britain's beacon of law and order, rocked by allegations of bribery. top brass resigning in disgrace, and today, a stunning breach of security. time to call in sherlock holmes? >>> and death of a whistle blower. sean hoare lived the tabloid life to the limit. drugs, booze, and cell phones. that's how he got his sensati sensational stories. looks like he saved the best one for last. >>> then, news corp. and politicians, we've seen the cozy connection in britain, but here in america, for political contributions, you'll never guess who gets the most murdoch money. >>> back now to our in-depth report, the murdoch hacking scandal and a key question, how deeply involved were the police and exactly why did they shut down their original phone hacking investigation back in 2007? my guests tonight worked with murdoch as senior editor for the times of london and has insider's knowledge of the close or perhaps too close relationship between the police and the tabloids. welcome, nicholas waptchak. i want to get to the hearing, but this was fascinating to watch. >> i can't th
are swept up in britain's phone hacking scandal. >>> concert chaos, thousands run for safety when a stage collapses. in ottawa. >>> and in hiding, casey anthony gets out of jail and out of sight. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning, everyone. appreciate you joining us. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. it's turning into the scandal that just won't quit. the voice mail hacking and police bribery investigation that's rocked england is snowballing. the latest this morning, britain's top police official, the head of scotland yard, has resigned, and the well-connected former chief executive of rupert murdoch's news international has been arrested. elizabeth palmer rorz. >> reporter: rebekah brooks had willingly made an appointment to go to the police station to answer questions when she arrived, she was arrested. anything she tells detectives now will become a formal part of the criminal inquiry into phone hacking and bribery of the "news of the world." brooks' arrest came as a surprise, but this was a shock. >> i have this afternoon informed the palace, secretary and the mayor
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
murdoch's media empire. the message is clear, both the u.s. and great britain are turning up the heat. >>> in china, a section of bridge collapses. sending a tourist bus plunging into the forest below and the death toll could get higher. >>> clock is ticking and tensions are soaring and if you want an idea how things heat are over the debt crisis, listen to this. president obama storms out of yesterday's meeting vowing he will veto any extension of the debt ceiling that is only short term. reports say he said to aeric cantor, quote, many could bring down my presidency. >>> the august 2nd deadline is looming and pessimism is growing. a major rating agency says it will review the nation' sterling bond rating for a possible downgrade. we are covering the angles of this all-important debt talk story. dan lothian at the white house with reaction to the extraordinary ratcheting up of tensions. ali velshi is giving us the bottom line on the economics. why should you care that u.s. bonds could face a brutal reality check? ali, let's start with you. a downgrade would be like seeing your person
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the phone hacking scandal in britain came full comes full circle today, with word that the "news of the world" tabloid will cease to publish after 168 years in business. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the news electrified britain-- sunday's edition of "news of the world"-- the most widely read english language newspaper in the world-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with le
. >>> now let's turn to the phone hacking scandal in britain where each day brings fresh revelations. tonight, scotland yard's lead investigator says there may be as many as 4,000 victims in the case against rupert murdoch's media empire and among them, former prime minister gordon brown who says his family's privacy was violated by a story that hit very close to home. stephanie gosk has the report from london. >> reporter: the british public wants answers. rupert murdoch and top executive, rebecca brooks have all been asked to testify next week before a parliament committee. the powerful trio have yet to agree but "news international" the subsidiary that ran "the news of the world" is already defending itself against the latest allegations. in an interview on the bbc today, former prime minister, gordon brown, accused "news international" of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find this happened because of the links with criminals. >> reporter: in 2006, a murdoch paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brow
. could a massive probe now under way in britain happen here in the united states? and the obama money-maybing machine. who's behind the cash and can the republicans compete? >>> president obama and the congressional leadership are under enormous pressure right now, about 40 minutes into their latest round of debt crisis talks. they haveless than three weeks until the deadline to raise the legal limit on the federal debt. and by all accounts, they're still very far apart. what if anything emerges from this meeting? consider the very dire warnings from the chairman of the federal reserve. ben bernanke using very strong words today, telling congress that the global financial system would be thrown into enormous disarray. that's a direct quote, if the u.s. treasury is deadbeat on its debt. >> ff we went so far as to default on the debt, it would be a major crisis. the treasury security is view as the most safest and liquid in the world. it's the foundation for much of our financial system. and the negotiation that it would become suddenly unreliable and ill liquid would throw show shockwa
. it's still galloping its way through great britain where it is the story. tomorrow we get to hear from rupert murdoch. tonight there's another new development in this. we want to begin our reporting with nbc's stephanie gosk in london. stephanie, good evening. >> good evening, brian. every day since this scandal broke, there seems it be a new bombshell. revelations, resignations, arrests. the last 24 hours are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen who are the latest casualties in the phone hacking scandal. scotland yard is being accused of mishandling the investigation into "news of the world qug, maintaining at times close relationships with the very people they were supposed to be investigating. police officers accepting bribes from reporters has allegedly been commonplace. stephenson and yates deny any wrong doing on their part. >> i have acted wi
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
britain's political law enforcement and journalistic establishment is really a waste of everyone's time. (laughter) you know, i know what the problem, is you're jealous. as a newscorp property, you're not upset that your standards have been corrupted by your scandal boner ethic. you're upset they get to have the fun while you get to sit on your hands. this scandal was made for you guys! for god's sake, look at these, d.s.k., made men, that's a great one. obama beats weiner. osama bin laden bin west banking. these are priceless puns. imagine the frustration that the pun masters over there must be feeling. they're missing out on the chance to shame a high profile media mogul, make that nasty insinuations about his second in command. indulge in puns about her personal appearance. and the death of a whistle-blower? right! i mean, it's easy. (cheers and applause) it's so easy! poor bastards! now, i'm not suggesting you don't have the balls to confront murdoch on this, i've seen you do it. when this scandal broke in 2009, fox's steve barney yanked murdoch's ass out of sun valley and laid the
. >> jon, this. >> the paper hacked voice-mail of the families of britain's soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan. >> jon: wow!, why would they even -- >> i don't know, jon, perhaps the same reason they also did this. >> staffers with the now-defunct nuptially tried to hack into the phone of 9/11 victims. >> jon: suddenly we're on a game show. pretty [bleep] depressing. >> it's very depressing. >> jon: why would they need the details of victims of 9/11. >> well, neighbor might sell one or two extra papers, jon. but the real cherry on this [bleep] sunday was the case of poor milly dowler, a missing 13-year-old girl that had britain riveted. >> during the period of time when she was missing the news of the world were using a private investigater to listen her voice-mail. >> jon: to help in the search for the -- >> maybe, maybe, jon, but just to be sure, let's check. >> the voice-mail box of milly's phone filled up. the news of the world were hungry for more information for more stories so they intervened and deleted the messages. >> jon: i think i just threw up in my mouth a little
roberts is there. >>> the bombshell from britain. breaking news. the head of scotland yard resigns and it comes after another stunning arrest. rupert murdoch's protege this time. where will the dom knows end? >>> the heat wave. the dangerous heat spreading across the nation. more than three dozen states now on alert tonight. it's going to be a stifling week ahead. >>> home free? casey anthony out of prison tonight. a smile from the mother, but this is what she heard in return. >> caylee! >>> and, happy birthday. on the eve of nelson mandela's 93rd birthday, an exclusive interview. what he told her and howow he sd it changed her forever. >>> good evening. and we begin this sunday night with that dramatic ending. the u.s. versus japan in the final of the women's world cup soccer tournament in germany. it was a tense, hard-fought battle, so evenly matched. the u.s. playing for its third world title. japan, carrying the hopes of a nation that's endured so much heartbreak this year. with just minutes to play, the u.s. scored, victory so close. as you might have seen, japan soon answered
think the murdoch empire and great britain is coming down. if it leaps the atlantic to the united states, it's really big trouble. and i feel sorry for murdoch going up against the parliamentary committee because it's going to be very, very tough on him. i don't know if he had anything to do with it. but this is aucwfully high up, joe. it's reached to murdoch's son and the prime minister's office in great britain. this is going to metastasize. >> you hear all of the talk in the press about the murdoches, the murdoches, the murdoches. they don't run the company by themselves. there is a board. and at some point, they're going to tell the murdochs this type of dynasty did not work in egypt. it's not going to work in news corp. you're going to have to step down. and i suspect that you're going to see -- i agree with pat. i don't see how the murdoch family survives this. i don't see how the sons take over the empire. this keeps exploding oochlgt. >> -- exploding. >> a couple of things, the brand has been damaged irreparably already, whatever comes across the states here and the department of
of britain, outraged by the betrayal of trust by parts of our newspaper industry, who have spoken out up and down this country, who have contacted members across this house and told us of their concerns. the will of parliament was clear. the will of the public was clear. and now, britain's most powerful media owner has had to bend to that will. this debate is an opportunity to understand how we got here and where we go from here. i will speak briefly to allow others to speak in what has been curtailed debate. the terrible revelations of the last week have shaken us all. they have caused immense pain and heartache to reap families, as they learned their most private moments were stolen from them to sell newspapers. as each day has gone by, i am sure all of us will have felt the same. surely it cannot get any worse than this. but it has. the bone of milly dowler -- phone of milly dowler, the victims of 7/7, the families of our war dead, and the personal details of our former prime minister. and we are told there is worse to come. these revelations have uncovered a pattern of sustained crim
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
it at 2.5% of the cost. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning that portugal's debt has been downgraded to junk status. does he not agreed that
to bailing out greece. >> britain is not in the euro. while i am prime minister, it will never be. we should not be involved in the euro areas internal arrangements. only euro countries were involved in the first bailout. only eurozone countries have been in the discussion about further bailout. it is right not to use the e.u.- wide financial stability mechanism for future aid to greece. >> the worst outcome for the british economy from the greek crisis would be a disorderly and chaotic the of fault -- default and departure from the euro. what discussions have we had about preparing for that default which is inevitable? the president himself has said that it does not need to be disorderly to dissolve the without the currency's much destruction. >> what is causing disorder and the fact they're going bankrupt. nothing said in this chamber will alter that. if greece can neither withdraw or default, then good money via our money or the imf will be wasted bailing out greece. why not leave an orderly withdrawal of greece from the euro? >> is it time to dispose of these things? checks seem to have
in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging information, but the fact that the government is concerned in one place and not the other is somewhat humorous or dreadful, depending on your point of view. host: thank you for calling the idea this morning. a bit more from the can paulson editorial this morning. every news organization host: next call on the british phone hacking scandal and its impact comes from denver. hello. caller: i'd think it has been going on for a long time in america. the sponsors, rep john de gaulle, michigan, and republicans worked together with the chamber of commerce to defeat it in 1997. him and reagan had health plans to take $1,900,000 in total compensation and resigned. his three underlings took almost 1100 million dollars. host: tie this into what we are talking about. caller: i think that this is going on for a long time. where do
the scandal ever closer into the political arena. and think about this, not only has britain lost faith in their journalists, but they've lost faith in politicians and now in the police as well. a point to make is, growing up as a kid in london, you look at scotland yard and stunned by their investigate zeal and incorruptibility, hold on a second, they were taking payments from journalists. >> speaking of fragility, rupert murdoch himself is 80 years old. today he was doddering. much of the question today, somebody tried to pie him in the face, he looked like a mugging victim. how plausible is his claim today he's really not in charge anymore? >> well, i think it's inherently a difficult defense because he might say he can't remember, but that raises questions about his role of chief executive of a prominent, multi-billion dollar business, one of the predatory media companies in the world, so he can defend himself against sort of charges that he knew about criminal activity from british journalists, but that only puts him into deeper water in terms of chief executive and chairman of new
in the local pub in britain, losing your job normally ends in drinking a pint, and these journalists had a lot to reflect on. the 168-year-old tabloid is a british institution. the phone hacking scandal left it in a political vortex, from which it couldn't escape. its owner, rupert murdoch, realized his entire empire was at risk of being tainted. one can only imagine the conversation he had with his son james, who runs the uk business. >> i feel regret. clearly the practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> reporter: it was the revelation that a murdered school girl had been targeted by journalists from the paper who eavesdropped on her cell phone messages that was the beginning of the end for the paper. hacking into cell phone messages is illegal in the uk. the scandal that the "news of the world" had been systematical systematically eavesdropping on people for years had been swirling around westminster, with some telling politicians that it was the work of a rogue reporter. >> i believe he was the o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 201 (some duplicates have been removed)

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